DEA Proposes New Regulations Allowing Non-Law Enforcement To Collect Unwanted Drug Bust Spoils

Federal authorities are proposing new regulations that would give the public more options to properly and legally get rid of unwanted controlled substances in an effort to help take highly abused prescription drugs off the streets. The new regulations would allow, for the first time, non-law enforcement entities to collect the unwanted drugs for disposal. The DEA also intends for local police departments and sheriff’s offices to continue hosting prescription-drug “take-back” events, as they have since 2010.

In Florida, it is illegal for one to attempt to or obtain a controlled substance by fraud or some means of fraud. Fraud can be by forgery, alteration, or deceit used to obtain or keep a prescription or of any written order, or by the use of a false name or the giving of a false address, or by the concealment of a material fact. Within the last few years, the frequency of prescription drug abuse has reached an all-time high throughout the U.S. Prescription medications contain highly addictive properties and are easily available to most, from juveniles to the elderly, contributing to their common use. While prescription drugs are legal when used as prescribed, by someone who does not have a legitimate prescription, or are obtained by another through misrepresentation or fraud, then they can be classified as illegal controlled substances. imagespills.jpg

On a larger scale, so-called Jacksonville pill-pushers, pill-mills they operate, and other connections they have throughout the state have caught the attention of police and prosecutors in recent years as drug investigators have begun focusing on painkiller drugs that can be equally harmful if abused.

Many of the arrests in cases like these are everyday citizens selling pills and marijuana. However, this new saturation of Jacksonville pill sales in the drug market has led to many arrests of professionals, such as doctors, pharmacists, and others involved in the medical industry. Unlike simple buyers and sellers, this new wave of drug crime defendants are being charged with massive frauds and racketeering scams.

Facing these additional charges elevates the case to an entirely new level. An experienced Jacksonville drug crimes attorney can help those facing significant sanctions and prison time.
Many times, the main actors in charge of operating pill schemes are making huge amounts of illicit cash. When arrested, the main actors will be facing a harsh minimum mandatory sentences under Florida law, even if they have no prior criminal history .

Many times in cases like this there are peripheral “co-conspirators” who were simply doing what their bosses told them to do without knowledge that this was part of a bigger money-making scheme. Prosecutors may overlook those facts, casting as wide a net as possible. In doing so, weak cases may be pushed as part of the public relations campaign put on for the media. Following coverage of raids and arrests, the media is nowhere to be found when defense attorneys are successful in having the charges reduced or dismissed because of a lack of evidence or other weakness in the state’s case.

Many times, the accused is merely trying to make a little extra cash to pay the bills. However, the cost of going away to prison for one’s crime could be more than any bill could ever amount. Sometimes, the offender is in desperate need of being cleaned up. One’s hope for a treatment program is not out of reach. There are options other than a jail cell. An experienced Jacksonville drug crimes attorney can provide those options.


The Forbess Law Firm has been aiding clients who face criminal charges in Jacksonville for years and is here to provide aggressive criminal defense to anyone accused of a crime. If you or a loved one requires a Jacksonville criminal defense lawyer, contact our firm today. We are available through our website or by calling us at 904-634-0900.

Additional Source: DEA: Let pharmacies, police accept unused controlled substances, Amy Pavuk, The Orlando Sentinel